The American colonies : Religion and Politics

Introduction 175 years after the arrival of the first English-speaking settlers in North America until the Declaration of Independence laid the foundation of a new model of nation. The distinctive characteristic ideals and contradictions of colonial America shaped the civilization of the United States until very recently. I. Puritans' Promised Land. Those who migrated to New England for religious reasons after the Pilgrim Fathers believed that they had been called to take part in an event of both historical and […]

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English Expansionism

Introduction The Anglo-American World is but colonial. Its present extension is the result of England's self-affirmation and ambition to become a major world power. Therefore, the words "empire" and "imperialism" describe England's struggle for national and international sovereignty. The first consequence of English expansionism was the west ward impulse of the Anglo-Saxon element, first into the Celtic periphery of the British Isles, then across the Atlantic and finally into Africa and Australasia. The second more recent consequence is the emergence […]

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The Act of Union of 1707

Introduction Scotland was never conquered by England. There were attempts but they failed. At the end of the 13th century, the wars of independence began. In May 1st 1707, the Act of Union was ratified between England and Scotland: the Scottish Parliament and the English Parliament were suspended. They created the British Parliament and formed the Great Britain by the Union of Scotland and England. At the time, Scotland was already a protestant country (the Reformation came in the 16th […]

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