Activer SSH sous CPanel

Il peut être extrêmement utile d'activer la connexion SSH chez certains hébergeurs qui la proposent, comme SiteGround. Cela permet de gagner pas mal de temps, notamment lorsque l'on utilise wp-cli.

Mais avant de pouvoir se connecter, il faut d'abord l'activer dans les options de CPanel.

Activation de la connection SSH dans CPanel

Rendez-vous dans CPanel > Security > SSH Shell Access :

Ensuite, cliquez sur le bouton Manage SSH Keys:

Nous avons ensuite le choix entre deux solutions : soit nous créons la paire de clés privées/publiques sur le serveur et nous les copions sur notre machine locale, soit nous la créons en locale et l'envoyons sur le serveur. Je suis plutôt pour la seconde solution.

Création des clés SSH

On se rend dans le répertoire SSH de notre utilisateur et on liste le répertoire:

cd ~/.ssh
ls

Si le fichier id_rsa.pub existe déjà, il suffit d'afficher son contenu:

cat id_rsa.pub

Si le fichier n'existe pas, il suffit de le créer:

ssh-keygen

Copiez le contenu du fichier, il s'agit de la clé publique que nous allons importer dans CPanel.

Import de notre clé SSH dans CPanel

Cliquez sur Import Key:

Renommez la clé pour id_rsa puis collez le contenu de votre clé SSH publique:

Il ne vous reste plus qu'à vous connecter en SSH au serveur. Suivant votre hébergeur, le numéro du port SSH peut changer pour des raisons de sécurité. Chez SiteGround, SSH tourne sur le port 18765:

ssh CPANEL_USER@CPANEL_SERVER -p18765

Bon ssh !

Death of a Salesman: the play's structure, a memory play

Death of a Salesman: the play's structure, a memory play photo

If the external plot of Death of a Salesman may be divided into chronologically organised sequences: Act one (Monday evening and night); Act two (Tuesday), and the requiem a few days after (Willy's burial), the same is not true of the internal plot: Willy's stream of consciousness. In "the inside of Willy's head", past and present are blurred. Memories constantly impinge on present situations and, conversely, the present is put at some distance by the flood of recollections.

The past/present dichotomy is replaced by a non-past; non-present, in which different temporal layers commingle and coalesce. This non-past/non-present is confined to Willy's inner mind, to Willy's subjective world.

'A mobile concurrency of past and present'

(The expression is by Miller, from his introduction to his Collected Plays, p.26)

Miller's aim in Death of a Salesman is to erase any gap between a remembered past - that would be evoked through words - and a present that would be performed on stage. In Death of a Salesman both past and present are given theatrical representation. There is no clear cut boundary between them. Thanks to the expressionistic technique of scrim and curtain, the characters may exist in both the present and the past. For example, Biff and Happy are seen as teenagers and adults successively.

There are no flashbacks in Death of a Salesman. Better than the erroneous term flashback, the phrase double exposure would be more appropriate. In Willy’s mind, past and present exist on the same level, Willy perceives himself both in the present and in the past - which is made up of various strata. In a way, Willy is schizophrenic; overwork, worry and repressed guilt have caused his mental collapse. In this state of nervous breakdown, past and present are inextricably mingled, time is, as it were, exploded.

In Death of a Salesman, Willy is both the self-remembering I, looking back upon himself, and the remembered I itself, that is to say the salesman as he used to be. Similarly, the same actors play their present and past selves, this is the case not only for Willy’s sons but also for Bernard, who has become a successful lawyer.

The dramatic unities, notably time, have been abolished in the most radical sense, indeed the function of memory entails a multiplicity of temporal levels, a series of different locations (Boston; New York but also the Prairie - through Willy’s father), and finally a loss of any fixed identity. In a sense, the exploded house, with its transparent walls, its scrims and curtains is an objective correlative (a concrete, practical, tangible image) for an exploding consciousness, in which spatial and temporal fragments get intertwined.

Lire la suite! »

The Great Gatsby: characters and characterization

In the Great Gatsby, characters are not introduced in a traditional way. They are not described in any detail and cannot be studied separately. Thanks to his "ideographic" method of character-portrayal, Fitzgerald suggests one idea through an attitude, a gesture but does not provide a final explanation. It is up to the reader to reconstruct the pieces of the puzzle into a coherent whole.

The author's technique is close to the Joycean "signature" when the character is broken down into its separate parts, and one or two of the parts are made to stand for the whole. Thus, Gatsby's presence for example is signalled by his indescribable smile (54, III) or by his colourful suits, his hollow-eyed stare or Wolfshiem's by his hairy nostrils. This is a stylized method of presentation, a virtual iconography of character whereby the soul of a being is shown forth through one exterior element.

This study will fall into parts: in the first one, we will see how characters are gradually characterized by the readers from a few signs and in the second one, we will demonstrate that characters must be understood through their relationships with objects.

A stylized technique of characterization

Ambiguous signs

Instead of the over-detailed description of 19th century novelists, we find in the case of each character a few signs that may be contradictory. It is often a material or a physical detail that points to a moral dimension of the character, as with Hawthorne and Melville.

Daisy’s voice is alluded to several times in the novel. It is because of this voice that Gatsby falls madly in love with Daisy: “I think that the voice held him most - that voice was a deathless song” (end of chapter V, p. 103). Yet, Nick realizes on the first he visits the Carraways that Daisy’s voice lacks sincerity, and that it gives away Daisy’s duplicity: “the instant her voice broke off… I felt the basic insincerity of what she has said” (p.24).

From these two contradictory signs, the magic power of the voice and and the insincerity of that same voice an interpretation is suggested. The meaning is finally made explicit by none other than Gatsby during the night of the accident. The latter, thinking back to his past, recalls his first date with the woman whom he was to love so much ever after. It so happened that Daisy had caught a cold so that her voice was huskier (VIII, 155). At that point in time Gatsby realized that the charm and youth of that voice was very much a matter of wealth. Daisy’s melodious voice was not so much due to genuine passion as to the glamour of money (VIII, 126).

From an opposition between two signs the reader is left to infer meaning. For instance, Wilson the garage-owner is first seen as a passive, ghastly silhouette “a blond, spiritless man, anaemic, and faintly handsome” (II, 31), but this lack of presence is contradicted by the end (chapter VII, VIII) when he turns out to be a destructive force bent on taking vengeance on his wife’s killer. Our first impression of the man is therefore not borne out by the story’s denouement.

Lire la suite! »

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